Bananas fibre
Start each morning with a high-fibre breakfast like a bowl of cereal with banana slices. (Photo: Pixabay)

A recent study led by scientists at Melbourne’s Monash University has found that eating a fibre-rich diet has the potential to change a person’s immune system, reducing their susceptibility to food allergies.

The research followed a group of mice that were allergic to peanuts, monitoring the changes when increasing fibre in their diet. According to the scientists, the fibre appeared to reshape the microbiota (gut flora) in the gut and colon, reversing the allergy.

“The microbiota in the gut assist the immune system in resisting allergies through the breaking down of fibre into short-chain fatty acids,” the report reads. These fatty acids boosted the dendritic cells in our immune system (cells which control whether an allergic response against food allergen will occur).

“This opens up a potential route for drug therapy for allergies by delivering short-chain fatty acids as a treatment.”

Asparagus
Most greens like asparagus can help you up your fibre intake. (Photo: Pixabay)

A recent study led by scientists at Melbourne’s Monash University has found that eating a fibre-rich diet has the potential to change a person’s immune system, reducing their susceptibility to food allergies.

The research followed a group of mice that were allergic to peanuts, monitoring the changes when increasing fibre in their diet. According to the scientists, the fibre appeared to reshape the microbiota (gut flora) in the gut and colon, reversing the allergy.

“The microbiota in the gut assist the immune system in resisting allergies through the breaking down of fibre into short-chain fatty acids,” the report reads. These fatty acids boosted the dendritic cells in our immune system (cells which control whether an allergic response against food allergen will occur).

“This opens up a potential route for drug therapy for allergies by delivering short-chain fatty acids as a treatment.”

Interestingly, the study also notes that a lack of vitamin A, usually sourced through fibre-rich fruit and vegies, may actually contribute to food allergies. This is because the dendritic cells that fight allergic responses actually rely on vitamin A to work properly.

Jian Tan, one of the leading scientists on the study, says human trials now need to occur to confirm whether a high-fibre diet could help humans with allergies.

Always consult your GP or dietitian before making changes to your diet, especially regarding food allergies.

Text: The Australian Women’s Weekly / Additional Reporting: Sean Tan

Also read: Top 10 High-Fibre Foods To Add To Your Diet


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